Artist’s statement

It is the maker’s responsibility to respect the tree by using its timbers wisely and investing time into the creation of tomorrow’s antiques. This is the central philosophy of my craft.

I am a third generation woodworker, this is a point of pride for me but it comes with responsibility. I use my father’s and grandfather’s tools regularly. I am incredibly fortunate to have had my father as my first teacher and life mentor, and despite his recent passing, he is always at my bench.

I live in central Victoria between Daylesford and Kyneton and have abundant blackwood on our property. It has always been a dream of mine to make high quality furniture from this resource. This year I will mill on site from storm fallen logs, air dry and 2016 will see the furniture.

I grew up in Melbourne surrounded by good Scandinavian and Australian made furniture. I learnt respect for our craft and artistic endeavour.

I love clean smooth lines with little fuss, showing off the timber and the joinery. The ‘Shakers’ work is very important to my early pieces and the Japanese influence is seen in my love of angles and shaping.

In the Saddleback stool I set myself the challenge of bringing the angular base into the coopered curved seat. I am proud of this piece particularly the transition between the base and the seat.

My carpentry background shows in the strength of construction of my pieces, I believe as makers we should never lose sight of the function of our work, nor the potential for its longevity. I love the challenge of chasing the form of the design by shaping away the bulk, the illusions we can create.

Teaching for me is a passion, I love watching the new students at work and the joy of accomplishment. I learn and grow as a maker being involved in the challenges of students’ designs, and I believe strongly in promoting our craft through teaching.

Most of all I would love to continue to make as my father did into his late eighties.